Townsville Theatrical Society Fresh Fields May 1958

“Fresh Fields” was performed on Thursday 15, Friday 16, and Saturday 17 May, 1958, at the Theatre Royal.

‘Fresh Fields’, Theatre Royal
Thurs 15, Fri 16, Sat 17 May 1958
Cast
(In the Order of Appearance)
MISS SWAINE .................................... MARY TITMUS
LUDLOW. ........................................... RON FORNO
LADY LILIAN BEDWORTHY ............... TINA DAL ZILIO
LADY MARY CRABBE .......................... BARBARA DENHAM
TIM CRABBE. ...................................... DENNIS UNDERWOOD
MRS. PIDGEON. .................................. DEL NOTT
UNA PIDGEON..................................... FAY WRIGHT
TOM LARCOMB ................................. DOUG. STORTENBECKER
LADY STRAWHOLME.......................... GWEN EVANS

Stage Manager: L. KACZMECKI
Assistants: A. TEALBY, L. CHANDLER, P. UPTON, D. INNES, D. ROY.
Lighting: R. NEWSOME, R. WHYTE, N. WARD.
Wardrobe: BARBARA DENHAM.
Orchestra: LILIAN BENSTED, DESLEY CARFOOT, NORMA O'DEA, LIVIA RUBAGOTTI, H. NOTT,
G. PURCHASE, R. ALGY, N. MINON, N. GHEA.
 
Townsville Daily Bulletin Friday 16 May 1958
Review of ‘Fresh Fields’
“Fresh Fields” Presentation Entertaining
The Townsville Theatrical Society gave theatregoers an entertaining evening with their three-act play "Fresh Fields" in the Theatre Royal last night.
While the play may not have had the same appeal as those recently presented in the Royal, it was deserving of much more support than it received on the opening night.
In parts, the acting and scenes were unsurpassed by the plays which preceded it.
The beginning was a little slow and did not always sustain interest.
But it held the audience once it got under way.
Polished acting, particularly by leading players, Barbara Denham and Del Nott, compensated for any parts open to criticism.
"Fresh Fields" is the story of an aristocratic English family who are embarrassingly unfinancial.
Head of the house, Lady Mary Crabbe (Barbara Denham) sees as their answer Australians, Mrs. Pidgeon (Del Nott), her daughter Una (Fay Wright) and brother and uncle Tom Larcomb (Doug. Stortenbecker).
The Pidgeons and Tom are embarrassingly unpolished but financial.
Lady Crabbe induces them to stay as "guests", but on a paying basis.
They are the despair of Lady Crabbe's sister, Lady Lilian Bedworthy (Tina Dal Zilio), a spinster who has shelved the idea of marriage and, who writes a "Dorothy Dix" column.
Lady Crabbe's son, Tim (Dennis Underwood) takes little interest in the trio from Brisbane, which is most discouraging to Una.
Tom takes a lot of interest in Lady Bedworthy, but she is quite discouraging, too.
One of the best scenes in the play comes with Una's formal introduction to society when she has tea with Lady Crabbe and her friend, Lady Strawholme (Gwen Evans).
Una's tea-blowing and frequent "yeahs" upset Lady Crabbe and her sister.
There is a row and the Pidgeons, and Tom, take off. But they return and . . . .
Del Nott gives a great performance as the cheerful Mrs. Pidgeon. She handled the role faultlessly and charged it with all the comedy and zest required.
It is difficult to single her out from Barbara Denham as Lady Crabbe.
They were two widely different roles — one calling for almost continuous hilarious comedy and the other a more subtle comedy and dignity.
Barbara Denham gave all that the role asked. She was always sure of herself and captured completely the character she was playing.
Tina Dal Zilio was quite convinceing as Lady Lilian Bedworthy and played the part with enthusiasm.
Fay Wright is a newcomer to the Townsville stage, but made an impressive debut. She did not attempt to dress the role, but played it naturally.
Doug. Stortenbecker was always at home as the bluff, somewhat awkward, Tom Larcomb.
Another newcomer to the stage is Gwen Evans. Her portrayal of Lady Strawholme was such that theatregoers will want to see further performances from her.
Dennis Underwood handled the part of Tim Crabbe quite capably.
Others who added to the performance were — Ludlow (Jack Grasso) and Miss Swaine (Mary Titmus).
The play will be repeated: to-night and to-morrow night.

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